Ironworker Management Progressive Action Cooperative Trust

Expanding Job Opportunities for Ironworkers and their Contractors

  • 2018 North American Iron Workers / IMPACT Conference
  • Feb 11 -14
  • Secure your room TODAY!

Just wanted to say that Mark, Michael and Stuart from FMI and Trevor from PWC did an excellent job engaging the classroom in discussion each day, and had a great program format for teaching. The information they brought forward was extremely useful now as I'm sure it will be throughout my career. This was only my 2nd IMPACT course that I have attended, I would like to commend IMPACT on organizing these events for Ironworkers and contractors alike, IMPACT always put on an amazing program, and does a very good job at making these events comfortable and welcoming to attend. I plan to attend more IMPACT events as the information is always very useful and IMPACT does a great job of finding the right instructors for the occasion. I would like to thank everyone at IMPACT for the work they do to set these events up and providing the opportunity to attend these courses.

Regards,

Jacob Wicks
Chief Estimator
JCT Metals Inc.

News

NEWS(1)

Keeping Cool When it's Hot Out

05/18/2015

Originally appeared here.

Keeping cool on the job can be tough - especially with warmer months approaching. TECGEN® FR has incorporated decades of flame-resistant (FR) clothing experience to develop these guidelines for helping keep workers safe and comfortable year round.

1. Know your limits: Everyone is different. Understand what your body is capable of and don't push yourself too hard on the job. Carnegie Mellon recommends that workers get acclimatized slowly to warmer working conditions.

2. Stay hydrated: Make sure to keep plenty of water on site to avoid dehydration. In fact, the Texas Department of Insurance recommends encouraging employees to drink one cup every 15 to 20 minutes.

3. Take breaks: Even a short 15-minute break can help rejuvenate the body and get you back on track for a productive day. According to the North Carolina Department of Labor, workers should take frequent breaks in areas cooler than the work environment.

4. Choose proper attire. The CDC recommends wearing "light-colored, loose-fitting, breathable clothing" to avoid trapping in excess heat.

5. Educate yourself and your employees: Be sure to understand the risks of overheating on the job. Heat stress can result in injury, illness, and even death. OSHA suggests providing information on "health effects of heat, the symptoms of heat illness, how and when to respond to symptoms, and how to prevent illness."

Cortlandt Minnich works in Business Development for the TECGEN® Brand. Want to learn more about keeping coll in FR apparel? Visit our website athttp://www.industrial.tecgen.com/.

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